Tag: multitrack recording

These days, recording music is quite easy. For instance, if there is some glitch on the drum part, there is no need to repeat the entire song. The engineer will just work on the mistaken part and viola; the entire song will just play seamlessly without even giving the listener a hint about the edited part. Well, that’s what technology can do.

However, the use of multitracking recorder can be challenging at times too. If the band plays close together, there can be a tendency that the singer’s microphone will pick up the drummer’s mistake. There are times when the microphone will pick up another sound and the sound “leaks” to the mic. This will give engineers a headache since it would be hard to record the music this way since it will create a “muddy” or “distant” sound. To avoid this issue, it is best to record each part separately. Hence, recording engineers will create a song having one instrument used at a time. And starting with the drum’s rhythm track is the best way to start it. Next in line is the bass guitar. Then, the lead guitar follows. Recording the keyboards can be last. Each of the musicians who created the song can then listen to the music later using headphones. When all recordings are done, all tracks will be combined to create a beautiful music. This manner of recording makes it easy for the engineer to make necessary corrections for any mistake made.

In some way, multitrack recording is practical too when it comes to the cost. Since musicians will record one at a time, there is only one microphone needed. This saves the recording company from buying a lot of microphones. Meanwhile, the isolated type of recording makes the entire process flexible. After all, you don’t need musicians to be at one place at the same time. For instance, the drummer may record his track in Los Angeles while the guitarist may record his track in New York. One of them simply needs to forward the recorded sound track to another who will simply add this to his work. This method is called “overdubbing”. There are also times when the song was recorded together with the entire band but the engineer overdub a different instrument to the song for a more powerful effect. It can be a brassy horn or strings.

For a solo or instrumental song, Bartlett suggests recording several takes, like each of its track. Hence, the engineer will simply pick the preferable parts from each take. Hence, it will be easier to compose the ideal take, even better than the actual take since the engineer has already deleted some parts and polished the song. This is the reason why songs we hear over the radio are seamlessly perfect!

Indeed multitrack recording can be very interesting to know, especially if you have the passion for music and dream of creating your own music someday. To know more about this technology, simply visit http://multitrackhq.com/.

 

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